The Steven Spielberg Three Step Guide to Rejection

"In this industry, you almost have to like rejection" - the wise words of a guest-speaker during SiLA.

British Pathé Entire Archive Now On YouTube

Behind the Scenes of “I Love Lucy” – 1953

Go behind the scenes of “I Love Lucy” – the television show that would set the model for practically all live studio audience sitcoms since.

(Source: cosmosonic)

 

(Source: therobertmain)

Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid Script

This week in Movie Greats: Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid.

I think the look of the show is great. There was a bit of an adjustment for me. I had been living with these characters and this world since 1991, so I had close to twenty years of pictures in my head of what these characters looked like, and the banners and the castles, and of course it doesn’t look like that. But that’s fine. It does take a bit of adjustment on the writer’s part but I’m not one of these writers who go crazy and says, “I described six buttons on the jacket and you put eight buttons on the jacket, you Hollywood idiots!” I’ve seen too many writers like that when I was on the other side, in Hollywood. When you work in television or film, it is a collaborative medium, and you have to allow the other collaborators to bring their own creative impulse to it, too.

Is there anything I can do for you? 


You should always end up a request with this. That’s one of the many lessons you get on your first week in the city where dreamers come to work hard. And you need to learn how to brag about yourself. You need to tell everybody you are in town and you are here to leave your creative mark. No one’s safe. Share your passion. Tell everybody. If anything, for many, the next eight weeks will be the death of “downplaying one-selves”. At the end of the day, you can’t spend your whole life fearing you are going to lose something by opening yourself up to collaboration. See, in this industry the most successful projects come from people who don’t hoard what’s special about them but instead share it with the world. We are in this, to move people, to make them laugh and cry. We are here to immerse them in the powerful experience that is telling good stories, so much that audiences don’t even smell the popcorn when they are watching the final product of our collaborative creations. 


I am leaving you with a classic: “Sunset Blvd.” (1950). Get inspired, create, share. Repeat.


Is there anything I can do for you?
Is there anything I can do for you? 
You should always end up a request with this. That’s one of the many lessons you get on your first week in the city where dreamers come to work hard. And you need to learn how to brag about yourself. You need to tell everybody you are in town and you are here to leave your creative mark. No one’s safe. Share your passion. Tell everybody. If anything, for many, the next eight weeks will be the death of “downplaying one-selves”. At the end of the day, you can’t spend your whole life fearing you are going to lose something by opening yourself up to collaboration. See, in this industry the most successful projects come from people who don’t hoard what’s special about them but instead share it with the world. We are in this, to move people, to make them laugh and cry. We are here to immerse them in the powerful experience that is telling good stories, so much that audiences don’t even smell the popcorn when they are watching the final product of our collaborative creations. 
I am leaving you with a classic: “Sunset Blvd.” (1950). Get inspired, create, share. Repeat.
Is there anything I can do for you?
No matter what you do in LA, your behavior is appropriate for the city. Los Angeles has no assumed correct mode of use. No one’s going to save you; no one’s looking out for you. It’s the only city I know where that’s the explicit premise of living there—that’s the deal you make when you move to LA. The city, ironically, is emotionally authentic. It says: no one loves you; you’re the least important person in the room; get over it. What matters is what you do there. The whole thing is ridiculous. It’s the most ridiculous city in the world — but everyone who lives there knows that. No one thinks that L.A. “works,” or that it’s well-designed, or that it’s perfectly functional, or even that it makes sense to have put it there in the first place; they just think it’s interesting. And they have fun there. In LA, you don’t have to be embarrassed by yourself. You’re not driven into a state of endless, vaguely militarized self-justification by your xenophobic neighbors. Los Angeles is where you confront the objective fact that you mean nothing; everything there somehow precedes you, and it’s bigger than you and more abstract than you and indifferent to you. You don’t matter. You’re free. (link)

No matter what you do in LA, your behavior is appropriate for the city. Los Angeles has no assumed correct mode of use. No one’s going to save you; no one’s looking out for you. It’s the only city I know where that’s the explicit premise of living there—that’s the deal you make when you move to LA. The city, ironically, is emotionally authentic. It says: no one loves you; you’re the least important person in the room; get over it. What matters is what you do there. The whole thing is ridiculous. It’s the most ridiculous city in the world — but everyone who lives there knows that. No one thinks that L.A. “works,” or that it’s well-designed, or that it’s perfectly functional, or even that it makes sense to have put it there in the first place; they just think it’s interesting. And they have fun there. In LA, you don’t have to be embarrassed by yourself. You’re not driven into a state of endless, vaguely militarized self-justification by your xenophobic neighbors. Los Angeles is where you confront the objective fact that you mean nothing; everything there somehow precedes you, and it’s bigger than you and more abstract than you and indifferent to you. You don’t matter. You’re free. (link)

You can’t think of doing anything else, can you?

You can’t think of doing anything else, can you?

See, once in a while, once in a blue moon, the universe has a way of making sure we wind up exactly where we belong.

See, once in a while, once in a blue moon, the universe has a way of making sure we wind up exactly where we belong.